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Archive for the ‘Paris’ Category

Egyptian Billionaire Offers To Buy A Private Island to House And Feed War Refugees

    NB Commentary:
    Now for some good news. I wonder if Donald Trump thought about doing this for his campaign props. Imagine how many voters would vote him into office if he bought an island for all those immigrants that he says should not be coming into the country. In fact, he could create a nice prison refuge on this already prison refuge and hoard all the Syrian miscreants and Mexicans! Imagine that?

    Donald Trump plans to build a cemetery at Trump National Golf Course in New Jersey’s Bedminster Township

    Well he already bought himself a huge golf course in NJ to bury his old derrière in/on so why not follow in the footsteps of this great billionaire and do the same. In fact, why not let all the billionaires in the world get together and buy a few islands for those folks they feel need to be gotten out of the way of their advancement. I mean this guy is promising to take care of the infrastructure and housing, etc. he just needs some support. What is it better to kill us off and stuff us in mass graves than to give us our own island on this huge planet?? Seriously. You can certainly see how these folks talk out of both sides of their mouths. Their solution to real problems is simply to complain about them or have wars over them, but never to do anything of substance to eradicate the problem. The concept of sharing their wealth is preposterous unless they can gain in some way from it.

    Egyptian Billionaire Offers To Buy A Private Island to House And Feed War Refugees

    By Joseph Gibson on September 7, 2015 in Articles › Billionaire News
    Usually when a billionaire buys a private island, one gets the sense that it’s merely for personal pleasure. Frequently, billionaires buy private islands just so they can keep up with their rival billionaire peers who already own one (or several). But today we’re learning of an Egyptian billionaire who wants to buy an island for a very unique and incredible reason. Egyptian telecommunications tycoon Naguib Sawiris wants to use his hypothetical private island as a place whereinternational refugees and migrants can live in safety and humanity…
    GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images
    Naguib’s idea isn’t just a Twitter-fueled flight of fancy, he also talked about his idea during a recent television interview. During the interview, he reiterated his plans to approach the governments of Greece and Italy with his idea, going on to say the island would feature “temporary shelters to house the people, then you start employing the people to build housing, schools, universities, hospitals. And if things improve, whoever wants to go back (to their homeland) goes back.” Naguib would front the costs for food, energy, infrastructure and more for as long as was necessary.
    He also said that the current situation for refugees and migrants is unacceptable, saying “The way they are being treated now, they are being treated like cattle.”
     Sawiris’ outrage about the state of refugees throughout the world was reportedly stoked by a famous photo that recently made headlines. The photo shows the body of Aylan Kurdi, a three-year-old boy who drowned when a boat on its way to the Greek island Kos wrecked at sea. The photo showed a single individual who fell victim to poor conditions for immigrants, but it represents a much larger situation that affects many thousands of people every year. Naguib said the he plans to name his island Aylan.

    “My conscience has been awakened by the picture of this child. God put the image of this child in front of us for a reason. He could have been swallowed by the sea… I am serious with my intentions. I want to feel good about having done something good. Provide me with the island and I will do the rest.”

    An estimated 2000 refugees or more have been lost at sea on the way to Europe from places like Syria, Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan in this year alone. Part of this is also because of a general increase in immigration into Europe – Germany in particular is one of the most welcoming countries in the European Union towards immigrants, expected to take in around 800,000 refugees before 2015 comes to a close. But Germany is somewhat of an exception. Other European nations are not nearly as open to accepting immigrants.
    Given these dire circumstances, hopefully Sawiris will make some progress on his plan for a private island specifically for displaced refugees. But it won’t be easy even if he manages to acquire a suitable island (something that would be easier for him than it would be for most other people, with his net worth of some$3 billion). During his aforementioned TV interview, he discussed some of these potential obstacles standing before his dream of an Independence island, like deciding on jurisdictional issues and complying with existing customs laws. But it seems clear that any attempt to improve things toward safer conditions for traveling immigrants and refugees would be a step in the right direction.
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America: Your Solidarity with Paris is Embarrassingly Misguided

America: Your Solidarity with Paris is Embarrassingly Misguided



Op-Ed by Claire Bernish
November 14, 2015
(ANTIMEDIA) The World, at Large — We are in mourning. Again. Indeed, Paris is in mourning, again.
For the second time in less than a year, we are all de facto Parisians — with Facebook profiles, casinos, and whole buildings draped in the blue, white, and red of the French flag. Solidarity as sympathy, bien sûr — a most poignant message that humanity stands with Paris — and will act decisively to avenge the “carnage” unexpectedly wrought by those whose motives most will never fall victim to, much less comprehend.
Most?
Evidently, despite the accumulated knowledge of the entire planet at our disposal through the computer screen, solidarity has escaped some of us.
And I am weary.
Without question, I mourn for Paris’ recent victims and their families — and I would never claim knowledgeable firsthand experience of the same. But I refuse — despite my partial French heritage — to cloak myself in nationalism of any stripe or star, particularly not now. Because, besides victims in Paris, an incomprehensibly astronomic number of people have been grieving loss of the highest order for some time — in places whose names roll off our tongues as if it’s accepted that violence simply happens there — and a majority likely couldn’t guess the colors on these victims’ flags.
You see, I also mourn for those killed mere hours before Paris crumbled into chaos, in strikingly similar attacks in Beirut.
I mourn the hundreds of thousands displaced or killed in Syria, no matter their pledged allegiance. No matter their professed religion. No matter.
I mourn for the millions killed in ongoing and renewed, illegal United States’ aggression in Iraq — and those facing a torturous demise from exposure to depleted uranium employed in violation of international and humanitarian law — for reasons far closer to ‘American’ and corporate hegemony than compassionate principle.
I mourn the untold number killed in the United States’ insidious — and seemingly permanent — war in Afghanistan. And the countless children there who know nothing of peace, much less the feeling of safety it brings. And patients and staff recently targeted, bombed, and then shot while fleeing the Médecins Sans Frontières hospital in Kunduz — and the irony of that humanitarian organization’s French roots.
I mourn those forced into human slavery or sex trafficking in Malaysia; and curse the scant hope they escape, now that the massive TPP has garnered U.S. government’s tacit approval of the abhorrence that is human trade.
I mourn for Palestinians, whose land was usurped — and whose lives and infrastructure and families and sense of security and HOMES are under siege and occupation by an illegal and actively terrorist State.
I mourn the patients and staff at the over 100 healthcare facilities in Yemen that have been BOMBED since March. And the apparently soulless who found an acceptable target in hospitals.
I mourn for Yemen.
I mourn for the victims of complicit government violence in Mexico, and 43 students and their families who lack answers.
I mourn for Chinese men, women, and children working, quite literally, as slaves, so the West can be rude at dinner and take endless pictures — of its narcissistically apathetic self.
I mourn rampant genocide — past and present — for the sake of manifest destiny. And empire. And imperialism. And inexplicable and unstated reasons.
In fact, I mourn for all victims of terror, whether State or group sponsored, without conditions attached to my grief — no matter location, nor loyalty, nor arbitrary geopolitical happenstance of location of a victim’s birth. And I’m already grieving those soon to be terror’s next victims; since, as French President François Hollande jarringly warned, avenging Paris’ victims just birthed (yet another) “PITILESS” war.
As if gentle were somehow a method to employ in waging war.
Yes, I mourn for Paris. But I do so while weeping in shame at the deplorable supercilious judgment ensconced in Western reaction to it; for countless pitiable xenophobes and their endless vapid justifications; for arrogant commentary from politicians and their media mouthpieces with their embarrassing post-tragedy clamoring to exploit ignorant heartstrings for the appropriate victims; for the endless War of Terror — and the service members who somehow haven’t yet deduced that this would ALL END if they simply refused to fucking fight.
The fact is, grief on this scale is exhausting. And I’m very nearly out of tears.
So keep these victims around the globe in mind — every, single man, woman and child who has, who is, and who will suffer the maiming, horror, torture, and death that’s as necessary to war as those who take up arms — when you next excuse a politician’s stance on war, because the rest of his or her platform seems really promising.
Or, at least, seems the lesser of two evils.
And shake that flag from your social media profile; and your home; and your thoughts. Because as long as you wear just one flag, your attempt to stand with victims of terror is a most embarrassingly hollow solidarity, indeed.

NB Commentary: KENYA ATTACK THAT LEFT 147 DEAD COMPARED TO PARIS ATTACK NEWS COVERAGE

NB Commentary: 

Any attack that is hosted by MSM is only done when it suits the overall agenda. Anything outside of the agenda and was not orchestrated by the puppet masters and their puppets has little to no importance unless it can be capitalized upon. #BringBackOurGirls Movement. In which, case it became a National and international project to have people holding white boards in front of them saying “Bring Back Our Girls:. In short order it was found to be a bit of a hoax for two reasons, the school mentioned was not the school where Boko Haram had raided. 2. Alternative news outlets exposed the lunacy of this one and it quickly became a non story. However, that did not stop Boko Haram from its terroristic threats and barbarism, but not in the context of the International spotlight.
And remember the bombing of the Mall In Kenya (Westgate shopping mall attack). That too hit the national/international newswire.. It served the agenda of fear and trepidation and shielded the real issues that were going on at the time. More proof that there has to be an agenda.
So… when there is a big hype about something in the news, look around, there is probably something else that is happening or has happened that they need to blow up another story to distract the masses. And sometimes, it’s just social engineering.

KENYA ATTACK THAT LEFT 147 DEAD COMPARED TO PARIS ATTACK NEWS COVERAGE

     NOVEMBER 14, 2015
    The way Kenya is currently trending on Twitter and Facebook shows that folks have plenty to say about the Kenya attacks in comparison to the news coverage that the Paris attacks have received. As reported by CNN, 147 people were killed at Garissa University College in Kenya back on April 2, but news hounds might only remember the horrific attack at the Kenya college as a blip on the radar in the news cycle in comparison to the equally horrific Paris attacks.
    According to the website popularity tracking list called “What’s Hot” on Alexa.com, an Amazon company, a BBC News article about the 147 people killed in the Kenya attack by an Islamist group is the sixth most popular URL on their list as of this writing.
    So many tweets and posts are coming into Twitter and Facebook about Kenya that some readers are getting confused, wondering why the Kenya tweets are trending. The Kenya attacks not only left 147 people dead, but also injured at least 79 folks in the attack that lasted for hours. It was a sad day for Kenya, which saw the country experience an attack that claimed such a high death toll that it was the largest amount of people killed on Kenyan soil since 1998, when more than 200 people lost their lives in the bombing of the U. S. Embassy in Nairobi.
    The disparity of attention between the Kenyan attacks and the Parisian attacks are being blamed on the fact that Kenya is a third-world country.
    The fact that Facebook has allowed folks to change their profile photos to French flags with Facebook’s new filter to allow them to support Paris, as reported by TIME‎, is being compared to the lack of Kenyan flag filters on Facebook during the time Kenya was attacked.
    Other attacks are being questioned and re-examined in the wake of the tragic Paris attacks, along with queries about the news coverage, or lack thereof, for other tragic events.
    As written by Jeremy Wheeler on Facebook about the Paris and Kenya attacks, some social media users are noting the difference in the tragedies in terms of the outpouring of worldwide sympathy and news coverage.
    “Apologists for the terrorists who murdered in Paris are popping up even before the bodies are cold. Back in April when Islamist terrorists attacked a university in Kenya what was the excuse then? Did you even hear about it?”
    The Kenya attack on Garissa University College in northeastern Kenya is being brought back to life months later as a means for social media users to give attention to other terrorist attacks around the world.
    While social media users recognize that both attacks are tragic, Facebook user Ann VanRyan wrote to Facebook, asking about the option for a Kenya flag overlay as Facebook offers the France flag overlay.

    “Facebook… Where’s my option to have the Kenya flag overlay on my profile pic? This is equally as horrendous and is happening every day in the poorest parts of our world. ‪#‎LookForTheHelpersJess‬
    Related searches such as Kenya Paris and the #prayforKenya hashtag are also trending in the wake of the controversy over the difference in news coverage. The Kenya attack articles are being retweeted, causing some users to think the Kenya attack just occurred.
    (AP Photo/Sayyid Azim)

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